The Best Backyard Chicken Coops

The Best Backyard Chicken Coops

Whether you raise chickens in your backyard as a hobby or a side gig to make money, there’s no doubt that that it’s a lot of work. For some people, raising chickens is a passion and they do take it seriously. Either case, one thing is for sure, you’ll need a good chicken coop to keep your brood.

Our editor’s choice for the best backyard chicken coops has to be the SnapLock Formex Large Chicken Coop Backyard Hen House. The coop is large enough to accommodate 4 nesting hens at the same time. The coop is also sturdy and weather resistant. And you can easily adjust the space inside the coop by removing the dividers.

In addition to this top quality chicken coop, we also reviewed 11 more coops that cover a wide range of features, materials, and prices.  The 12 products we reviewed are:

12 Best Backyard Chicken Coops Reviews

1. SnapLock Formex Large Chicken Coop Backyard Hen House 4-6 Large 6-12 Bantams

As usual we start with the very best. And of the many coops I have tried over the years, none matched the quality and durability of the SnapLock Formex Hen House. First off, this is one large coop that will give your chickens the space and comfort they need to lay their eggs in peace.

The coop has four nesting spots and three roosts each is 36 inches in size. With so much real estate you can raise 6 large chickens with ease or up to 12 bantams. Although the bantams are famous for their small size as well as the hyper-aggressive roosters, we’d recommend you don’t house more than 8 bantams in this coop.Ventilation is one one of the best features of this coop. Made from high quality plastic, this hen house from Formex has an adjustable ventilation system to keep your chickens cool and happy. You can get your hands on the eggs from outside the coop without a hassle.

To assemble the coop, all you need is just your hands and the manual. The parts snap into place and before you know it, you have a fully functional and well designed hen house ready for the chickens to move in.

Pros:

  • Large and sturdy.
  • Well-ventilated and gives you easy access to the eggs.
  • Assembly is a breeze without the need for tools.
  • Built-in roost bars for extra safety.

Cons:

  • No windows or built-in run.
  • Only suitable for nesting and sleeping of the chicken.

2. Petsfit Weatherproof Outdoor Chicken Coop with Nesting Box, Bottom Can be Removed for Easy Cleaning, 1-Year Warranty

Now if your chickens are not the uppity kind and are easy to please then you can offer them the Petsfit chicken coop. It’s as basic as they come and sells for an affordable price as well. It comes in two shades, either gray or red.

Like the Snaplock, this coop is designed for free range chickens. It doesn’t have a run, which means your chickens will only use it to sleep or lay eggs. Like a hotel, mainly. For nesting you have a box that nests two hens comfortably. The dividers are easy to move and adjust, but keep in mind that the top is fixed.You won’t have a pull-out tray in this one. However the floor has three panels that you can easily remove to give the coop a thorough cleaning. This is why the fixed rooftop is an issue for some. A removable rooftop would allow you to clean the coop without a hassle.

Pros:

  • Solid fir wood for durability.
  • Two front doors and another with stairs.
  • Holds 4 grown chickens.
  • Rain-resistant and comes with a one year warranty.

Cons:

  • Doesn’t have a run.
  • Rooftop is fixed.
  • Not easy to collect eggs.

3. Best Choice Products Outdoor Wooden Chicken Coop Wire Fence Hen House Poultry Cage, 80in, Brown, for 4 Birds

Another wooden coop that’s more suitable for someone just starting their chicken raising side gig. The best part about the Best Choice coop is that if you grow your brood you can always extend your coop and add more space to it for more chickens.

The coop is made from fir wood and the pen leads to the coop with a ramp and a sliding door which makes it fun for the chickens to waddle in and out of the housing area. The nesting box has a divider for two chickens to lay eggs together.It is easy to clean this chicken coop thanks to the removable tray that collects the bird droppings. It also allows you to clean the bedding area without much hassle. The whole coop is ideal for 4 grown chickens and it comes in one color, brown.

The product needs a few modifications to make it more durable and weather-resistant. If you purchase this coop be prepared to spend a few hours sealing the wood and adding a lock to the pen’s door for extra protection.

Pros:

  • Durable fir wood.
  • Has a pen for 4 chickens.
  • Ramp and swinging door.

Cons:

  • Needs extra work to make the wood weather-resistant.
  • Lacks a lock for the outer door.

4. Tangkula Large Chicken Coop, 58” Wooden Hen House Outdoor Backyard Garden Bunny Rabbit Hutch with Ventilation Door, Removable Tray & Ramp Chicken Coop (58 inches)

Some chicken coops are designed specifically for chickens. Others are more flexible and can work fine for either chickens or rabbits. The Tangkula is one of those multipurpose coops that adjust to whatever domestic fowls or small mammals you plan to raise.

The main advantage the Tangkula has, from my point of view, is how it has raised perches to keep the chickens dry and warm away from the rain or muddy grounds. The ventilation door keeps the coop cool when the sun makes it too hot outside.The sturdy fir wood makes this a good investment for your chickens. They have access to the coop through a ramp and the removable tray allows you to clean it with ease. The non-toxic paint protects the coop against rain.

While the cage or hutch isn’t exactly large enough to allow the chickens room to run and frolic, it will keep them safe from predators. You can use this coop inside an enclosure if you’re worried about the chickens’ safety.

Pros:

  • Multipurpose fir wood coop.
  • Non-toxic pain makes it weather-resistant.
  • Works well for chickens, rabbits or other small animals.

Cons:

  • Assembly is a handful.

5. PawHut 83″ Wooden Backyard Chicken Coop with Covered Run and Nesting Box

No all chickens would accept a basic coop with no amenities to live in. Yes, some chickens have blue blood too. So if your chickens descend from royal lineage, you might want to invest in something classy and up their alley. PawHut is just the one.

The first thing that gets your attention is the spacious run and extra large housing place. The chickens can stay inside the run or you can let them out in the backyard to exercise. The coop will house 2 to 3 grown chickens.The nesting box has a hinged top which you can open, collect your eggs, and shut it again without the chickens being any wiser. The roof also open in and lets you clean the whole coop and perform regular maintenance easily.

One last good feature that we liked about this coop is how compact it is. Despite giving the chickens plenty of room both in the housing area and the run, it can still fit nicely in a small space in your backyard.

Pros:

  • A stylish and classy coop.
  • Houses 3 grown chickens at most.
  • Easy access to the nesting box and the coop for cleaning.

Cons:

  • Seams require strong glue for sealing.
  • Lightweight wood.

6. Advantek Stilt House Rabbit Hutch Farmhouse Red

So we’ll take a break from chicken coops and give rabbits a try. Rabbits are those fluffy long-eared small animals that are a delight to watch. If you’re planning on growing rabbits in your backyards, then congratulations. You just got yourself a very rewarding hobby.

Now, the Advantek rabbit hutch is a good start for your hobby. The outdoor enclosure allows the rabbits to get some sun and fresh air safely from foxes and birds of prey. When they sense danger, they can scamper to the stilted nested box.It’s high over the ground for a reason. Rabbits like to burrow in the ground and if given a chance they’ll dig their way out of the safety of the hutch and disappear in the wilderness. The auburn color makes this hutch a good setting in your backyard.

Cleaning this rabbit hutch is a breeze. Pull out trays gives you access to inside the hutch. Rabbits are clean animals but you’d still want to inspect the rot-resistant fir wood hutch for bugs.

Pros:

  • Stilted fir wood hutch.
  • Rot-resistant and insect-resistant.
  • A decent-sized enclosure.

Cons:

  • Rabbits can chew through the walls.
  • The fence doesn’t have a door.

7. Confidence 62 Inch Rabbit Hutch Chicken Coop

Another chicken coop that also works as a rabbit hutch. The Confidence instills confidence in you to raise just about any small animal you can think of in these versatile coops. Not just rabbits, but even ferrets and guinea pigs can live there. As long as you don’t mix your species, you’ll be fine.What distinguishes this coop/hutch from other products is the quality of the wood. This is furniture quality wood that resists water and fungus. Damp wood encourages fungi and bugs to nest in the dark corners of the coop. However, this wood repels insects and prevents fungi from growing.

The steel wire is heavy duty and can withstand the chewing habits of the animals you raise there. The built-in open area is large enough to cater for two adult chickens or rabbits to live there.

Pros:

  • Suitable for chickens, rabbits, ferrets, or guinea pigs.
  • Furniture-grade wood.
  • Waterproof and anti fungal.

Cons:

  • Too small for a big brood.

8. Pawhut 91″ Deluxe Large Wooden Bunny Rabbit Hutch / Chicken Coop w/ Outdoor Run

Pawhut is famous for making animal homes which are convenient and functional at the same time. This deluxe wooden coop/hutch is no exception. Bot the run and the housing area have easy access for the animals to hop in and out. The two ramps on either side make that possible.

The run area is spacious enough as it covers the whole ground space of the coop. If that’s not enough for your animals, you might consider placing this coop/hutch in an enclosure in your backyard.Despite the large size, this coop cannot take more than a couple of grown animals or chickens at most. As we mentioned the run area takes up most of the space which leaves the small box at the top.

Pros:

  • Multiple ramps for easy access.
  • Decent-sized run.
  • Good quality for a starter hutch.

Cons:

  • Not fully sealed against the rain.

9. Merax Chicken Coop Wooden House Cage for Small Animals Hen Coop Nesting Box (Chicken Coop#1)

If you do care about appearances and would rather have every piece of outdoor furniture or structure to fit in with your backyard decor, then Merax would be the ideal choice. Of course your chicken or rabbits may not have the same regard for the green asphalt roof of the coop or the natural wood color combination. But that’s alright. As long as the chicken coop pleases your eyes.Besides the appealing looks, the wooden coop has plenty of functionality as well. It has a spacious activities area that your chicken would take advantage of. And there’s the comfortable nesting area which can take two nesting chicken at a time. The steel pole that holds the ramp is a thoughtful touch.

Pros:

  • Nice color combination that blends in the backyard.
  • Easy to clean with the removable tray.
  • Fir wood and waterproof paint finish.

Cons:

  • Pricey for a coop in this size.
  • The tray rusts with usage.

10. PawHut 87″ Deluxe Wooden Backyard Chicken Coop with Large Outdoor Run and Nesting Box

We have seen so far how the chicken coops either come without a run or the run is too small to allow the chickens more than a walking space. This is something that the Pawhut 87 inch Deluxe sets to remedy.

The enclosure that comes with this coop is so large, your chicken will literally run and play without fear for their safety from predators. But don’t let that large pen fool you. The overall design of the coop is compact and you can tuck it in a corner comfortably.Ventilation is another good feature that you and your chickens would appreciate about the Pawhut. It has screened windows that let the air in and keep the inside of the coop dry and fresh at all times. The roof open in and gives you easy access to the coop for regular cleaning duties.

Pros:

  • Compact size.
  • Large pen for the chickens to run.
  • Easy access to collect the eggs.

Cons:

  • Flimsy top that needs reinforcing.

11. PawHut 122″ Outdoor Wooden Rabbit Hutch Small Animal Enclosure With Outdoor Runs Ramps

If the last Pawhut failed to impress you, then maybe you should give this one a chance. Size is everything about this starter rabbit hutch. I know what you’re thinking. Rabbits need a lot of space, so how can this hutch be enough? Let me refer you to the picture above to give you an idea about how large the run.And did I mention that it doesn’t come with just one run, but two? One on each side. So your bunny rabbits will be jumping all over the place and chase each other until one of them wins. After that you’ll need to get a larger hutch of course because the lady rabbit is pregnant and her family is about to get exponentially bigger.

Pros:

  • Offers indoor and outdoor protection.
  • Double large runs.
  • Compact design.

Cons:

  • A starter hutch with limited size.
  • Not easy to put together.

12. Trixie Pet Products Chicken Coop Duplex with Outdoor Run, 123.5 by 27.5 by 42.5″, Brown

The last chicken coop on our list has a little twist. It’s not just one coop, but two in one. How about that? It’s like a duplex but for chicken or small animals. The two housing areas are on either side of a decent run that will delight your chickens and make them feel special.You can raise 6 grown chickens in there or 10 bantam ones. The double coop is adjustable as well. The roof opens in for easy access and you can remove the dividers to give your chickens more room in the nesting boxes.

The outdoor run has a partition to let you control which chickens go where if you feel like separating them for some reason.

Pros:

  • A duplex with two nesting houses.
  • Large run with a partition.
  • Takes up to 6 grown chicken or 10 bantams.

Cons:

  • Ramp too slick for the chickens.
  • Raccoons can enter it though.

Thing to Consider Before Buying

Even if your chickens are not picky, you still can’t just trust any coop to house your babies. As a discerning person who only wants the best for those chickens, you know that you’ll need to do some research and compare coops to find out which is the one.

We saved you the trouble and did a quick rundown of the best features to look for in your coop. Here are the most important ones.

Size

Even if humans keep saying that size doesn’t matter, chickens are smart enough to know that isn’t true. Size does matter, and the size of the coop as well as the size of the roost means a lot to your chickens.

Naturally, the more chickens you have, the bigger the coop you need to set up in your backyard. Chickens do need space so that they can lay their eggs in peace. And of course there’s the size of the chickens themselves.

Some chicken breeds come in large sizes, so you’ll need to factor that in your calculations when you browse the chicken coops we reviewed for you below. Also think about the future and whether you plan to grow your brood by adding more chickens.

Material

Generally speaking, chicken coops come in two varieties. Either wooden or plastic. Wood coops are considered the best option since wood is sturdy, well-ventilated, and protects the chicken from the elements.

But there’s a lot that can be said for plastic coops as well. They’re lighter, easy to install, and maintaining them is a breeze. From removable litter trays to easy access to eggs, they have advantages over wood coops that are worth considering.

Wooden coops have another issue. The quality of the wood makes a big difference to the durability and sturdiness of the coop. Coops made from cheap material or knock off wood tend to crack after a few months.

Space

Whoever said that chickens like to be crammed together obviously knows nothing about this domestic birds. Each one of your chickens care about her own personal space as much as you do if not more.

Inside the coop, your cuddly chicken needs at least one and a half square feet of real estate. Outside, she’ll need about eight square feet to run around and chase bugs. Since we’re talking about the coops here, we’ll limit ourselves to the space inside the hen house.

Also keep in mind that some chickens are naturally larger than others. It’s their genes and you don’t want to tell a chicken that she’s fat to her face. They won’t appreciate it. The larger the chicken, the more space she needs. Count your chickens and multiply them by 1.5 square feet to know how much space you need.

Ventilation

Without proper ventilation you can’t expect your chicken to live long and prosper. Chickens enjoy a good breeze just like the next species. And for that you’ll need to consider two things.

The first is the design of the coop and whether it allows for fresh air to enter the coop, chase out the bad smells and prevent little bugs from nesting in the corners and under the roosts. A decent coop should consider the health and safety of the chickens that are going to call it home.

The second consideration is the location of the coop in the backyard. Is it a prime real estate area where temperate wind blows regularly and sends the chickens in a joyous spree of circling around with their wings stretched? If the answer is yes, then your brood will multiply and reward you with plenty of eggs.

Nesting

To say that the nesting place in the coop is important would be an understatement. This is where the chickens come to lay eggs. As we mentioned, they don’t like to be disturbed during this procedure.

The design of the coop should make the nesting place a cool, quiet, and easy to clean spot. You wouldn’t want the hen to feel warm and bothered while she’s laying eggs for you. The nesting box need to allow you easy access to collect those precious eggs.

Also make sure that while nesting the chickens won’t be disturbed with flashing light or loud noise that might spook them.

Egg Collection

Let’s face it. You’re not raising those fat chickens because they look cute or you plan to take them into the house as pets to annoy your cat. You raise chickens to collect eggs. So you’d want to have easy access to the eggs from outside the coop.

The last thing you’d want is to reach into the coop to get the eggs and have the chicken mistake you for an egg thief and attack you with the ferocity of a mother protecting her young. Not to mix metaphors or anything, but you really need to avoid those angry mothers with their sharp beaks.

Protection From Predators

As an experienced chicken breeder, you must know by now that you’re not the only one who covets those lovely eggs. Or their mothers for that matter. Other predators like foxes, crows, and the occasional eagle have chickens and eggs on the menu as well.

Which is why you’re getting a coop in the first place. You want to protect your hens. So make sure the nesting box has a lid with a latch that no crafty fox can penetrate. Also the door of the coop has to be sturdy enough to fend off the most aggressive of predators and keep your chickens clucking safely inside.

There is more information you need to know about backyard chicken coops.

Conclusion

When it comes to choosing a good chicken coop for your brood, it’s important to make sure you got a good quality coop and that it gives you and the chickens easy access to the nesting house. Luckily our editor’s choice fits the bill perfectly.

We chose  the SnapLock Formex Large Chicken Coop Backyard Hen House because it’s sturdy, maintenance free, and can house up to 6 normal size chickens or 12 bantams. You also get 4 nesting boxes which means you’ll be collecting a lot of eggs every day all year round apart from the winter months.

founder

Mike Zhang. Founder of FamilyLifeShare